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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted -  26/06/2006  :  04:02







Edited by - Invernahaille on 10 April 2007 04:41:19
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2007 : 16:40
We'd better start calling you Sir Robert.......


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
howardang
New Member


10 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2007 : 23:37

Hello Robert - I presume we met through our involvement with Hebridean Princess.

It seems a long time ago since then. I left them to run Hull Marina, and then spent the last 6 years as dockmaster in Hull before retiring last year.

Cheers,

 

Howard

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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 31/10/2007 : 14:54
Thats right Howard. You will remember the Camerons. Captain and Chief Engineer. We had a couple of noggins in the Tiree lounge if you recall.


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howardang
New Member


10 Posts
Posted - 01/11/2007 : 00:21

Yes I certainly remember Ian Cameron. I interviewed him for the post of Master in a pub in Great Yarmouth while we were fitting out the ship at George Priors. He only had a sft drink and it wasn't until sometime later that i found out that he was a senior member of the mormon church and therefore didn't really approve of alcohol. Nothing wrong with that, but I kept having to remind him that on a passenger ship like HP one of the attractions for passengers was the bar because he was always trying to shut it early!

Ian was a great asset to the ship but no longer involved; the last I heard he was involved in a company which organises holidays on cargo ships.

 

Howard

 




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 02/11/2007 : 12:01
I know what you mean Howard. He was a difficult Master to sail with. Have you heard from Louigi Jackonelli at all?


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2007 : 16:48
Was that the Gallon Can, Howard. I remember it well. The Landlady held a Masters ticket, and she did not tolerate any bad behaviour.


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2007 : 20:44
Hi Howard. Are you still communicating with OGFB?


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howardang
New Member


10 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2007 : 23:40
Sorry for the silence - we've been away for a week on the boat and just got back.

re Luigi, no I lost touch with him when I left HIC.

When did you move on from HP - I see from your previous postings that you are now in more exotic climes.

Howard


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howardang
New Member


10 Posts
Posted - 12/11/2007 : 14:36
Robert,

you may like this link to pictures of Hebridean Princess last winter in Hull (makes a change from Great yarmouth).

http://boatman.fotopic.net/p36041608.html

On a general ship note the website - Boatman-on-the-Humber has hundreds of ships in and around the Humber ports.

Cheers

Howard


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2007 : 12:00
Thanks for the info Howard. I saw a clip of her on the east coast a while ago. She seemed to be making a lot of smoke in the clip.


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howardang
New Member


10 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2007 : 15:12
Those Crossley main engine were always a slight cause for worry as far as the smuts and smoking were concerned. I know we occasionally had a problem getting hold of  spares quickly - I wonder how they are coping now. Those engines are now 47 years old.

Howard


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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 17/11/2007 : 12:30
Clydemarine are advertising on the T V  in the Grampian area about careers at sea.
Copied this from their web site.

Engineer Officer
 
Also In This Section
Go Back To:
 Careers
 

 If you have an interest in all things mechanical then a career as a Marine Engineer may be just what you are looking for.

Onboard a ship you would have the responsibility for the operation and maintenance of all the machinery. This would include the main engine (diesel - or steam perhaps), generators, cooling systems, control systems, hydraulics, pumps, air compressors, oil purifiers, distillation plant - and a lot more.

The Marine Engineer learns diverse skills necessary to trouble-shoot an electronic control circuit on a switchboard, overhaul large and small diesel engines or a refrigeration unit, make a new valve spindle on a lathe, weld a broken pipe or tackle any other job needed to keep the ship operating.

The training programme is of the "sandwich" style involving periods at College and at sea and will be completed in three years.

Below is an outline of the standard Engineering Cadet Training Scheme. The length and contents of specific phases may vary depending on which college a cadet studies at.

PHASE 1 - INDUCTION
Up to 6 months at college. All cadets will undertake the mandatory Pre-Sea courses:- Elementary First Aid, Personal Survival Techniques, Fire Prevention & Fire Fighting and Personal Safety & Social Responsibilities. Cadets will be given an introduction to the Merchant Navy and the VQ training they will receive at sea and will commence workshop skills training. Cadets with GCSE's only will also undertake some academic studies to prepare them for the HND studies later in the course.

PHASE 2 - FIRST SEA PHASE
Cadets will go to sea with their sponsoring company for a period of several months. During this time the cadet will undertake tasks and reports in their portfolio required for the Level 3 N/SVQ in Merchant Vessel Engineering. The cadet will be learning the work and duties of a Marine Engineer on board ship.

PHASE 3
Cadets return to college after their initial sea phase and embark upon the studies for Part 1 of the HND in Marine Engineering. Subjects studied during this phase will include:-
Engineering Science, Analytical Methods for Engieners, Pneumatics & Hydraulics, Instrumentation & Control Principles, Marine Electrical Systems, Marine Diesel Propulsion, Marine Turbine Propulsion, and Marine Auxilliary Plant.

PHASE 4 - SECOND SEA PHASE
Cadets will return to sea with their sponsor and will now continue working towards the Level 3 VQ in Merchant Vessel Engineering. As on the earlier sea phase the cadet will be required to complete tasks and reports in the portfolio and understudy the duty engineer. The cadet will also assist with any Safety Equipment maintenance that is carried out. By the end of this phase the cadet should be able to undertake the role of a Junior Engineer Officer on board ship under supervision.

PHASE 5
Cadets return to college after their second sea phase and commence the studies for Part 2 of the HND in Marine Engineering. Subjects studied during this phase will include:- Business & Management Techniques, Engineering Design, Naval Architecture, Thermodynamics and Management.
The cadet will be formally assessed on his VQ work and issued with the Level 3 VQ qualification. After completing the studies for the HND the cadet will undertake a final oral examination with an MCA exmainer to obtain his Certificate of Competency. The successful cadet will now progress to be a Junior Engineer Officer in the Merchant Navy.






Frank Wilkinson       Once Navy Always Navy Go to Top of Page

Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 26/11/2007 : 12:06
Probably run through the Southampton school.


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2007 : 16:46
Currently overseeing the dredging of the main shipping channels at both the commercial shipping and cruise line docks at Charlotte Armalie. The QM 2 has visited the deep water cruise liner docks twice over the last two weeks. It is good to see her representing British Shipping interest in the Carribean.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 28/11/2007 : 14:02
When the AIA were giving me my National Award (hint, hint) a nice man gave me a book on 'Greenwich and Woolwich at work' by Mary Mills.  Lots of interesting pics but I've never really looked at it until yesterday.  Look what I found:




I hope you can read the text.  What grabbed me was the complex, three dimensional planing machine.  The making of the mould is interesting and very complicated.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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