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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted -  26/06/2006  :  04:02







Edited by - Invernahaille on 10 April 2007 04:41:19
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 15/12/2010 : 20:06
Thomo, sorry I didn't reply earlier but thanks for your explanations about the change of fuel and power.

Notebooks...my father, as an RAF armourer, had notebooks filled with his own notes and detailed, accurate drawings of guns, bombs, mines etc. It's a wonder the books didn't have to be kept locked in a safe! That reminds me of reading the other day about how the Duke of Medina Sidonia, who was in charge of the Spanish Armada, had great detailed lists made in advance showing all his ships, their armament, number of sailors and soldiers, etc. Nothing kept secret, it was all promoted far and wide as propaganda. Lord Howard could therefore tell Queen Elizabeth that he knew in advance that the Spanish had a vast fleet and the English would need more ships and men. Of course Howard would have realised that the Duke's list would be much exaggerated but he wasn't going to tell QE that was he? Otherwise she might have cut his budget - nothing much changes!


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 27/12/2010 : 02:39
Merry Christmas and A happy and prosperous New Year to everyone at OGFB.

Seeing as it is at this time of the year, I thought I would pass on another bit of naval trivia, it was customery for the youngest member of crew to be given the Capatins or Masters jacket on Christmas day at sea, They were given run of the ship within, reason.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/12/2010 : 06:43
Same to you Robert. We had a similar thing in the army to the captain's jacket. Once a year at Xmas we put on a show and the custom was to take the mickey out of the officers and NCOs. Historically, 'The Lord of Misrule' was a common festival in very heirarchical societies, once a year the structure was turned on its head and the fool or beggar was king for a day.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 10/01/2011 : 16:50
Access to Manchester Docks Video.






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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 12/01/2011 : 16:53
There might be some interest for the mariners on this OG thread. Solving the puzzle of one of Moh's Navy relatives.


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 13/01/2011 : 02:33
Tizer,
         I gave Moh a bit of information a couple of years ago. As best that I could at the time. Biggest problem with MN records is that they are now held in Canada.

I know, dont ask?


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 08/02/2011 : 05:32
Robert. Good video of M/c docks. I made the link more accessible so perhaps it wil  get more viewers. Well worth the trouble, have a shufti!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 09/02/2011 : 01:40
Thanks for that Stanley. It is a good video, and pretty informative. Sadly gone now. Many happy memories though.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 09/02/2011 : 05:45
Posted this on SC by mistake,I thought of you whan I saw it.

LINK


Stanley Challenger Graham




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James Powell
New Member


22 Posts
Posted - 11/07/2011 : 09:18


quote:
Stanley wrote:
Change from coal to oil firing was post WW1 as Middle East oil became widely available. I don't know the exact date but it would be about 1920 I reckon. However you won't be surprised to hear I have a book... 'Short History of Marine Engineering' by E C Smith, published Cambridge 1937.




I have, in my buggary box at work, (then) A/SLt (RCNVR) E. Phipps Walker's copy of "Stokers Manual, 1927", as adopted by the RCN. It goes into a bit of detail as to oil firing, and laying out coal fires. Makes for fasinating reading, nice and light in comparison to "Naval Engineering Manual (2008)", or "21 000 SHP Cross Compound Turbine and Gearbox".

I'm studying for my Certificate 3A, onboard HMCS Protecteur. To answer questions further up the thread, we are the last 2 oil fired steam ships in the Canadian Forces, and amongst the last that steam for HM, buring fuel. (nuke's are a different kettle...). It appears as though we will be sailing until at least 2018, at which point, all bets are off.

The Certificate 3A is the engineering officer of the watch ticket, rather than the boiler op ticket, which I already hold.  I've sailed on PRO for the last 10 years, and likely will see her out until I retire, based on the date above.

I've done the coast of Somolia, and hartily recommend- somewhere else.  Anywhere else.  Just not Djibuti and the camel dock, please.

PO2 James Powell
HMCS Protecteur


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 11/07/2011 : 09:58
Welcome aboard young man, quite a few of the members are ex Maren. 10 years, thats a long draft and I agree with you about Somalia, a festering sore on an otherwise grand ocean. Good luck with the studying.


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James Powell
New Member


22 Posts
Posted - 11/07/2011 : 18:25
We do it a We do it a bit different, in that it isn't really 10 years in one spell, but has been broken up a little bit.  I spent 10 months or so off sailing YAG's doing officer cadet sea experience sails, and visual nav training.  I also spent the Vancouver Olympics fixing small craft, that took ~4 months more away from the big bateau.  I generally have worked as the controls tech, working on a fairly large Bailey Pnumatic computer.  (generally, a very simple PLC would be far better).    Anyway, once a Mar Eng on a tanker, always a tanker engineer, at least here.  We're a rare breed, being the only steam engineers left.  I requal'd a couple of the very last non tanker 2A's, and now there are very few left who have a 2A  (boiler operator, then class specific- all the plants were Y-100, but there were differences between ships, let alone classes.  Famously, there is the TBD pump, which was "To Be Determined").  The last of the Y-100 plants was HMCS Nippigon, who decommissioned in 1998. 

Somalia was a total waste of time.  The only good thing was the day we rescued a boat full of refugees- and then towed them back to Somalia.  Good news:  they survived the day.  Bad news:  The boat was a death trap, and was likely to be used to try and flee again- and the next time, there likely wouldn't be someone to rescue them.

James Powell


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 11/07/2011 : 23:39
Most of my "hot fog" was Admiralty 3 drum, just 1 with Y100, all of the former were FFO fueled boilers. Also nursed Bristol Olympus, Maritime Tynes, and General Electric G6 gas turbines, and Davey Paxmans, Napier Deltic, Foden, Enfield, Ford and Gardner diesels. More lately in civvy st, Russel Newbury's, AMCs, Ruston Hornsby's marinised Peugots, Kobota's and Mitsubishi's and a host of cobbled together combinations, 1 Bollinders and 1 SAB.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/07/2011 : 05:54
" We're a rare breed, being the only steam engineers left"  Still a few of us old farts left James but I agree, we're a dying breed. Nice to know someone is still learning about the trade, after all, a nuclear reactor is only a fancy boiler! I like the fact that you are still reading the old books and manuals. Did you see the discussion we had about MacGibbon's 'BOT and Marine Engineering Knowledge'? Robert (Invernahaille) is still reading his and I often get it out for light entertainment! The information is still accurate. I have the Sixth edition, not sure of the date. First bought by a bloke called Wood in Liverpool. I got it for £2.50, what a bargain!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 12/07/2011 : 18:43
To all you marine engineers, a link to Doxford two stroke  diesel opposed piston engines,
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-history/photos-big-machining-processes-doxford-sons-c1950s-181722/
 sorry if it was posted before


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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