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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted -  27/07/2007  :  15:42
I have just seen a spitfire fly over Burnley - possibly one of the ones you can build from a kit now.  It certainly sounded authentic


Say only a little but say it well
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2007 : 05:56
I agree with you John about engine noises.  I know why I don't like the sound of turbines, you can't identify them or make any diagnosis of engine condition from the sound.  They are either running or not.  Of course all this stems from a lifetime of depending on big engines, mostly diesel and steam.  I often smile to myself when walking in Barlick, I hear and engine and immediately diagnose why it isn't running properly, it's automatic.  Same applies to the exhaust note of locos, a good man can identify the configuration and condition just from the sound.  I've always been amazed by the precision of hearing and the way the brain interprets sounds.  A wagon driver, if he is any good, knows immediately when something changes in the engine note.  Same applies to a bloke living with an engine during his working day, you could tell immediately if anything changed as you were sat in the arm chair in the engine house.  I could go on........


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Ribble Rouser
Regular Member


125 Posts
Posted - 09/01/2008 : 20:32
Here are a few links to sites that offer the sounds of some classic aero engines:
Merlin in a Spitfire:
http://www.spitcrazy.com/spitsound.htm
Merlin in a Mustang:
http://www.aviationshoppe.com/Sounds1.html
wall to wall Merlins on Youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Vy7UgCwEkk
a Griffon in a Firefly:
http://video.aol.com/video-detail/australian-fairey-firefly-rolls-royce-griffon-engine-/3129215426
the Teutonic opposition; a Daimler Benz in a Bf 109:
http://dnausers.d-n-a.net/dnetrAzQ/uaswav.htm
Radials and inlines, including a Bristol Hercules, and links to a Napier Sabre in a Tempest and a Gnome rotary:
http://www.enginehistory.org/sounds.htm
and the insane sound of ‘six turning and four burning’ as a behemoth B36 flies over Jimmy Stewart…that’s six Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major 28 cylinder radials, each displacing 71 litres and developing 3,000 hp. (I think the four jets are cold-spooling as it flies over). Jimmy seems to get a glint in the eye as he hatches an idea…which he fulfils in the last clip…both from the film Strategic Air Command:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2IWZgW73zI&feature=related
and to finish, an extended clip with B36 start-up, taxi and take-off, with nice cockpit shots:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZSpqFPSK_c&feature=related

Edited by - Ribble Rouser on 09/01/2008 20:36:17


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GAK
Regular Member


133 Posts
Posted - 12/10/2009 : 04:02
Question
During the second world war, a Bolton Paul Defiant crashed in bad weather, somewhere beyond Springs Farm, in the middle of the night.
Does anyone know any more details of this? Both of the crew were killed, and I believe at least one of them was a New Zealander. I would be very pleased to hear any comments on the above. It was all very hush hush at the time. I'm sorry to be so vague about the time, but there can't be too many which fit the bill. I would guess at about 1940-1941.
GAK


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/10/2009 : 06:57
I think this might fill the bill...

http://web.ukonline.co.uk/lait/site/Defiant%20N3328.htm


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
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GAK
Regular Member


133 Posts
Posted - 12/10/2009 : 11:50
Thanks for that Stanley, it was quite a way past Springs Farm, but I could not remember the name of the farm. I did visit it at the time though. Sad time for the family in Australia. What a waste.
GAK


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 14/10/2009 : 09:35
Hi Gak, My Father was one of the Home Guard Personnel who was at the scene shortly after the crash, I remember him taking me there a few years later. There was a large patch of bare earth and it is is only fairly recently that anything started to grow there.


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GAK
Regular Member


133 Posts
Posted - 14/10/2009 : 13:28
Hi Thomo
I'm pretty sure my Father in Law would have been involved too. He was in the Home Guard at that time. His name was Frank Northrop.
Do you know of him?
Was it Brown Hill Farm?
GAK


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 14/10/2009 : 15:23
Brogden near the house Raygill, the farm is just behind the house but cannot remember its name.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 14/10/2009 : 15:30
Brogden area I think, possibly Lidget Flats Farm.


thomo Go to Top of Page
GAK
Regular Member


133 Posts
Posted - 02/05/2010 : 12:27
We have just had ANZAC day here (25 April) and this year the descendants of the fighter pilot Al Deere (who was born in Westport NZ)  took the opportunity of doing a fly past of the only Spitfire still airworthy in NZ here in Feilding and district. The aircraft has been in rebuilding mode for the past five years, and it is hoped that the flypast will become an annual event. They also very kindly put it on display at Palmerston North airport on the morning of ANZAC day, which was much appreciated.
GAK


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 03/05/2010 : 06:46


Sorry folks, I put it on the wrong thread!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 03/05/2010 : 17:32
Spitfires being prepared for action 

With the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain coming up there have been photos appearing such as the above one of Spitfires that was in The Times.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 04/05/2010 : 06:41
How many Hurricans survive? Much under-rated and if I remember rightly they had a lot of advantages. More easily repaired and less scarce metal in making them.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 04/05/2010 : 20:28
"Over 14,500 Hurricanes were built and at least 12 survive in airworthy condition worldwide, with other non-flying examples preserved by various air museums."....Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_Hawker_Hurricanes

The Spitfire was faster but the Hurricane more manoeuvrable- I wonder if this came about because the Spitfire evolved from a racing aircraft, whereas the Hurricane came from a long lineage of good fighter aircraft, latterly the Hawker Hind and Hart. Hawker didn't need to do much more than take the top wing off and put a cockpit on. Hurricanes did most of the work in the Battle of Britain.


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