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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted -  21/12/2007  :  11:56
I have uploaded my first picture to the Barlick site I hope to be able to add it in this thread if/when it gets approval from Doc. It is a postcard from the 1940s entitled Winged Heroes and showing Hawker Hurricanes. (The picture is in the next post if you are on page 1 of the thread; if you are on another page you need to go back tp page 1 to see it.)

Please feel free to add your own stories, pictures or comments regarding everything to do with aeroplanes and their pilots, both past and present.

Edited by - Tizer on 11/11/2010 15:11:42


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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 09/03/2008 : 14:36
Well Done Ian!

Last year I was on my way back from an old bike run based at Coningsby, when I was passed by the BBMF Lancaster trundling along in the opposite direction back to her Coningsby base. I looked up the schedule on their web site, and was amazed how far they travel, and how many events they can cover in one day. I'll keep an eye out in June.

Malcolm


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 09/03/2008 : 15:41
Our event is already on the BBMF website. ZA947's sortie for the day (subject to revision) includes a display at Liverpool and flypasts at Southport, Hartlepool, Barnoldswick and Broughton Hall. It depends which order they fly the venues. Best approach for us would be SW from Broughton Hall, over Thornton and follow the road into Barlick. The aircraft would then overfly RR Ghyll Brow, our venue at the RR Sports Club and the RR factory at Bankfield. If they approach from Ribble Valley, we will not get as good a view. No Merlins for the day but the dual 14 cylinder radial Pratt & Whitney power plants should provide a suitably evocative drone.


Ian Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 03/04/2008 : 22:48
Just an update on progress with the Dakota flypast. I have received all the paperwork from the BBMF and filled in all the forms requested. I have also annotated an OS map with the venue and known potential hazards within and around the 2 nautical mile air exclusivity zone that needs to be established for the flypast. I have to send this back to the BBMF for their sortie planning for the day. Copies of the paperwork have to be sent to the AUS (Air Utilisation Service) who co-ordinate the airspace for these events and inform other users. Further paperwork is sent to the RAF to accept the conditions of the flypast. All now ready for the post. I do hope it's fine on the 29th June!


Ian Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 04/04/2008 : 07:58
I admire your dedication.....  Keep us updated and we'll keep an eye open for the flight.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 04/04/2008 : 20:52
Just a process to go through Stanley, not as complex as a display which requires groundcrew personnel to coordinate the display. Much more strict on the regs as well, (no displays over built up areas and 250ft minimum separation from the crowd line). All BBMF sorties are counted as training routines for the crews involved. I have just checked on the BBMF website for 29th June. The Dakota will not be visiting Hartlepool after all, I misread this the first time round. It will visit Liverpool along with a Spitfire and Hurricane for a display routine, the Dakota will then do flypasts at Southport, Broughton Hall and Barlick. The Spitfire is doing the flypast at Hartlepool, probably on the way back to Coningsby. I marked Barlick airport on the map after speaking with one of the microlight users of the site. It's only in use for less than 27 days a year, (to avoid planning permission). I thought it prudent to sound them out as I did not know what rules applied to casual flyers with regard to the CAA and AUS. My mind is at rest after speaking with David, he is going to contact the other two users of the site and avail them of our event and post a notice of no flying for the day on the cabin. I have notified this arrangement to the AUS. Better to be safe than sorry. I hope I have covered all the bases, I'm sure the AUS will be in contact if they need any more info, exciting stuff! 


Ian Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/04/2008 : 07:13
I'd forgotten we had an airport down at Lower Carr!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 05/04/2008 : 13:25
Yep, nearly missed that one! I was looking round the BBMF and RAF Conningsby websites. The BBMF hangar is open to the public for tours during the week. I'm thinking of a trip on the bike sometime during the school summer hols, should make a good day.


Ian Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 08/04/2008 : 21:53
Its amazing what you find in your attic. We are in the process of a bit of a spring clean and clear out and I came across something I had forgotten I had , I can't remember where it came from but it's a bit of a gem for anyone interested in aircraft engines and the like. It's a collection of reprints from technical journals April, May and June 1944 on the Napier Sabre Engine as fitted to the Hawker Tempest, Typhoon and Sea Fury Aircraft. About 50 pages in total with exploded diagrams and descriptions of the manufacturing process, lots of pictures of the various bits that make up the 24 cylinder horizontal sleeve valve engine. The Sabre developed 2,200 b.h.p. at 3,700 r.p.m. and weighed in at 2,360 lbs. The Wikipedia link is below and a further link to a rather nice airbrush rendition by Makoto Ouchi of the engine in cutaway.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Sabre

http://www.khulsey.com/makoto_ouchi_napier_sabre.html





Ian Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 09/04/2008 : 08:16
If my memory serves me aright it was the Napier Sabre that caused so many problems early in the war as they were so unreliable and had to be serviced so frequently.  Problem was failure of the sleeve valves.  I have some stuff somewhere by John Howlett who was high up in the MAP about the fight he had to get the Air Ministry to listen to the pilot's opinions.  I remember him saying that the only people in Britain who really understood sleeve valves were Daimler.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 09/04/2008 : 09:44
Apperently the groundcrews had to run the engines up every couple of hours or so when the aircraft were on standby to keep the oil warm. They were a bugger to start if the oil was cold. I think some off these problems were sorted in the Mk II.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 09/04/2008 : 10:43
I remember reading a biography of a Canadian who was an RAF fighter pilot in the Battle of Britain (Johnny Kent?). He described how he learnt to fly and his work as a pilot in Canada in the 1930s, landing on ice etc. They drained the oil after every flight, put it in a can on the stove in the hut to keep warm, then filled again immediately before the next flight.

The same pilot at one time in WWII flew a blue-painted Spitfire on photo recce, with no guns of course to lighten it for extra speed and altitude. If you saw the enemy you could get away fast. But one day he was flying back from France when he saw Messerschmidts below him. He dived to gain speed and flashed through the Messerschmidts. The German pilots saw this bright blue Spitfire going past them at phenomenal speed and thought it must be a British fighter ace in a new type of Spitfire, saw they scarpered!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 10/04/2008 : 08:55
Guderian had a similar problem with his tanks outside Moscow......  history records that he never solved it.  Have you ever had a close look at the trucks the Russians use in Siberia?  They must use similar technology on aero engines.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 10/04/2008 : 10:12
I remember when we had that big winter freeze in the early 1980s and lorry drivers here were lighting fires under their fuel tanks to thaw out the diesel!


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 26/05/2008 : 16:55
Now here is a bit more health and safety gone mad. At the Howarth 1940's weekend we picked up a copy of a protest letter that was being distributed at the dance we attended on the Saturday night. Needless to say we signed our copy's and sent them off. The basic gist of the letter is as follows:

New EU legislation is due to be introduced on the 16th July of this year, clauses of which will insist on all passenger carrying aircraft capable of transporting more than 28 people to be fitted with emergency drop down oxygen masks. This is blanket legislation with, at present no exemptions for vintage aircraft such as the Douglas DC3 Dakota. The legislation known as EU-OPS was adopted in January 2007 and comes fully into force on the 16th of July of this year. It will have wide ranging consequences for the continued operation of a number of vintage and classic aircraft. In the case of the Dakota which is not a pressurized aircraft, it makes no sense at all, nevertheless it will lead to the imminent grounding of a number of classic and vintage aircraft operated by commercial airlines such as Air Atlantique, unless exemptions are introduced. This is the main thrust of the letter which was addressed to Sir Roy McNulty who is Chairman of The Civil Aviation Authority.

There is scope within the legislation for member states to introduce exemptions, hence the appeal to the CAA.

I would urge anyone with an interest in these classic aircraft to support the lobbying by writing to their MP's and the Civil Aviation Authority to object to the introduction of blanket EU legislation such as this without exemptions for vintage aircraft.

This link from the CAA gives an overview of the legislation.

http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/1196/Symposium%20presentation.pdf

The wikipedia link has further references.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EU_OPS

Found this press briefing from the Chairman of Air Atlantique who stiil operate the DC3 from Coventry.

http://www.skycontrol.net/history/last-passenger-flight-for-the-dc3-or-as-the-raf-called-it-%E2%80%93-dakota-a-final-chance-to-fly-on-the-world%E2%80%99s-greatest-airliner/









Edited by - panbiker on 27/05/2008 11:53:47


Ian Go to Top of Page
softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 27/05/2008 : 16:21
Ian

Well spotted, a number of these Europian Directives have had implications for heritage transport in recent times. There are always possibilities for Derogations to protect historical transport, but it needs the political will on behalf of the UK Government.
The Railway Preservation and Historical vehicle movements have actually employed  lobbyists to look after their interests (with some success) in recent years.
Very much a case of making as much fuss in Government circles as you can.

Malcolm 


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