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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted -  26/06/2006  :  04:02







Edited by - Invernahaille on 10 April 2007 04:41:19
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James Powell
New Member


22 Posts
Posted - 15/03/2007 : 04:25

For us, the ticket is actually only good for the class of ship for which it was issued.  In real terms, the plant is a 21000 SHP propulsive/ +2mw(e) plant.  (and yes, we work in a surreal 1/2 metric/  1/2 imperial world).  So, my 2A is only really good for HMCS Protecteur or HMCS Preserver.  It's good for the experience in any other case, but I would have to requalify on a different class of ship.  (which is understandable, given that there is not much the same between us and anything else!)

I'm 30, and probably about average age for a Cert 2 in the CF (Royal Canadian Navy).  I've had my cert 3 years now, and are looking at 3-5 years before I get a Cert 3.  (yes, we work backwards too!)

James




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 22/03/2007 : 00:00

Just thought I would revive this thread so that Robbie can have a sken at it.

I rembered something my first chief engineer told me many years ago He said that when he first went to sea, there were wooden ships and iron men. He stated that this adage had completely reversed over the last ten to twenty years. This was in 1970. God knows what he would think of todays ships. Unmanned sailng (U.M.S.) Sat Nav etc etc etc.




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James Powell
New Member


22 Posts
Posted - 23/03/2007 : 01:54

I've sailed wooden ships, and wouldn't consider myself a iron man :). 

Last one was Otter (YAG 312), which I had out on December 15th, back through Sidney Channel/ Baynes Channel in 2m seas, at 8 at night after a long day.  (one engineer, we are limited to 8 hours sailing/day unless exceptional...the storm the following 3 days was exceptional, as it treed my house, and did ~60 million pounds of damage)

James Powell




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 15/05/2007 : 17:35

 

 

 

 

 

This photograph was taken during the National Seaman's Strike in the late 1960's,

Langton Branch Dock had five Vessels from the Fleet of Ellerman Lines moored alongside.

 




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 15/05/2007 : 18:12

Ellerman Lines Big Four.

Introduction

This quartet was the largest passenger cargo liners of the once great Ellerman fleet, and they were able to make passage from London to Cape Town in 15 days. These all First Class attractive liners were considered some of the most luxurious round-Africa ships in their day, accommodating just 107 passengers, and were a considerable competition with the larger, famous Royal Rail Ships of the Union-Castle Line. The City of Port Elizabeth and her three sisters were known for their comfortable accommodations, having only single, and twin bedded cabins, although cabins some had an extra Pullman. All passenger cabins were located on A and B Decks, with those on A Deck being fitted with private bathrooms, whilst those on B Deck had shared facilities.

All Lounges were located on Promenade Deck, comprising of Drawing Room (forward), Foyer, Smoke Room, Writing Room, and the Verandah Café, which was also the dance venue. This delightful and cheerful room overlooked the swimming pool aft. Sports Deck was located directly above Promenade Deck. The Restaurant was located on 2nd deck (below B Deck). For ships of their size, they offered excellent children’s facilities having a large playroom and their own deck space.

As cargo liners, there were five holds, three forward and two aft, having a carrying capacity of 607, cu. ft.

All operated the London, Las Palmas, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, Lourenco, Marques, Beria service.

City of Port Elizabeth and her three sisters were withdrawn from service in 1971, and and were laid up. In September they were purchased ‘en bloc’ by Karageorgis Lines, with the intention to convert all four ships as ferries. However, there were thoughts of rebuilding two into luxury cruise ships, however, this dream was never fulfilled.

Indeed, all four were remarkable ships and served Ellerman Line well. Their later lives was certainly a varied one, details of which is described at each ship listed below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above MV City Of Durban leaving Cape Town South Africa.

Below T.S.M.V. City of Port Elizabeth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of Port Elizabeth departed London for her maiden voyage to Beira on January 10, 1953. She continued this service until 1970, and was sold to Michael A. Karageorgis, Piraeus in 1971 and she was renamed Mediterranean Island.

Built: 1952 Vickers Armstong, Newcastle, England

Yard: 120

GRT: 13,363-tons

Launched: 12 Mar 1952

Completed: 10 Dec 1952

Length: 164.8m - 541ft

Beam: 21.7m – 71.2ft

Engines: Doxford Type Diesels – 12,650 BHP

Propellers: Twin

Speed: 18.8kn max / 16.5kn service speed

Passengers: 107 - First Class

Later Names: Mediterranean Island 1971 - Mediterranean Sun 1975-80

Karageorgis Lines intended to convert her into a car ferry for the Patras - Ancona service. However, the idea came up to convert her into a luxury cruise ship. Due to the indecision of what to do with her, she remained idle until 1975, when she was renamed Mediterranean Sun, but remained idle until 1980. She was sold to be scrapped, arriving at Long Jong Industry Co. Ltd, Kaohsiung, Taiwan in June 1980, and this fine ship was the second of the quartet to be demolished.

T.S.M.V.  City of Exeter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second of the Quartet departed London for Beira in May 1953, and like her sister enjoyed 18 successful years plying her way to and from to Africa. However, as with most liners services around the world, air travel became more popular, and soon loadings dropped off rapidly. She like her sister City of Port Elizabeth was sold in 1971 to Michael A. Karageorgis, Piraeus in 1971. The City of Exeter was renamed Mediterranean Sea, a name she carried until 1995.

Built: 1952 Vickers Armstong, Newcastle, England

Yard: 121

GRT: 13,343-tons

Launched: 7 July 1952

Completed: 29 April 1953

Length: 164.8m - 541ft

Beam: 21.7m – 71.2ft

Engines: Doxford Type Diesels – 12,650 BHP

Propellers: Twin

Speed: 18.8kn max / 16.5kn service speed

Passengers: 107 - First Class

Later Names: Mediterranean Sea 1971, Tutku 1996, Alice 1996-98



Karageorgis Lines rebuilt her at Perama into an ultra modern Car Ferry, able to take 850 passengers. Her tonnage was now listed as 15,212-tons. She was completed in December 1972 and she commenced the Patras - Brindisi - Ancona service. In 1974 she was registered at Famagusta and was listed as being 16,384-tons. In 1982 she commenced a direct service between Ancona to Patras.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mediterranean Sea has no semblance of the elegant ship she one was.

In June 1995 Mediterranean Sea was sold to Istanbul Sea Lines S.A., a company with its HQ in Germany. In January 1996, she was transferred to Deep Ocean Shipping, Panama and renamed Tutku. I December that same year she came under the banner of Armon Trading, Piraeus, who renamed her Alice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above Re-named as Tutku.

T.S.M.V. City of York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of York departed London in November 1953, and together with her sisters maintained this service until sold to Michael A. Karageorgis, Piraeus in 1971, when she became the Mediterranean Sky. The City of York / Mediterranean Sky, proved to be the most successful of the quartet, remaining in service the longest. Her last voyage was in August 1996, when she sailed from Brindisi to Patras.

Built: 1952 Vickers Armstong, Newcastle, England

Yard: 122

GRT: 13,345-tons

Launched: 30 March 1953

Completed: 26 October 1953

Length: 164.8m - 541ft

Beam: 21.7m – 71.2ft

Engines: Doxford Type Diesels – 12,650 BHP

Propellers: Twin

Speed: 18.8kn max / 16.5kn service speed

Passengers: 107 - First Class

Later Names: Mediterranean Sky 1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to the companies’ financial situation, the Mediterranean Sky was arrested in 1997, whilst in Patras. She remained in Patras until 1999, when she was towed to Eleusis, and laid up and was virtually abandoned. Then, in late November, 2002, she began to take on water and began to list. In order to stop her sinking, she was towed to shallow water and was grounded. In January 2003, Mediterranean Sky keeled over on her side in Eleusus Bay. She remains there awaiting her fate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below Mediterranean Sky All dressed up and nowhere to go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T.S.M.V. City of Durban.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The City of Durban departed London May 1954 and joined her sisters’ successful service to Africa. However, she and her three sisters were sold to Michael A. Karageorgis Group in 1971, when she was renamed Mediterranean Dolphin.

Built: 1953 Vickers Armstong, Newcastle, England

Yard: 123

GRT: 13,345-tons

Launched: 28 May 1953

Completed: May 1954

Length: 164.8m - 541ft

Beam: 21.7m – 71.2ft

Engines: Doxford Type Diesels – 12,650 BHP

Propellers: Twin

Speed: 18.8kn max / 16.5kn service speed

Passengers: 107 - First Class

Later Names: Mediterranean Dolphin 1971.

City of Durban was the last of the series to be built, but sadly, she was the first of the famous Quartet to be scrapped.

City of Durban suffered the same fate as the City of Port of Elizabeth. Although Karageorgis Lines had intentions to convert her and her sister into a car ferry, then later as a luxury cruise ship. They both remained idle. On March 30 1974, Mediterranean Dolphin arrived at Kaohsiung, and was broken up.

Summary.

The “City of Port Elizabeth” class were indeed notable ships, Ellerman’s last deep sea combination-passenger liners, but, many forget that they were the last vessels of their kind to operate from the port of Hull.

After the rebuilding, the transformation of the City of York and the City of Exeter was, to say the least, extreme. Karageorgis turned these graceful ocean liners to futuristic style ferries, which most “salts” will consider as “nothing short of a travesty”!

Today, the sole survivor, City of York / Mediterranean Sky lies on her side at Eleusis Bay, and has been awaiting her fate for the last few years. (Believed to have been scrapped where she lay).

The sad part about the story is that these ships had  seen less than twenty years sea service. Air travel has a lot to answer for.




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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 16/05/2007 : 11:57

Callunna, if you have questions about canal boats, I just may be able to help.

Thomo ex Doug Moore Boatbuilders.




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/05/2007 : 07:26

I've been scanning a lot of negs in and here are some old steamers from Dort in Stoom at Dordrecht in 1994.  The only qualification for entry was that they should be steam propelled....

 




Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/05/2007 : 07:45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 28/05/2007 : 12:03
Nice pics Stanley. There are also some beautiful steam engined pleasure boats on lake windermere in the lake district.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 28/05/2007 : 17:53
There were other stem powered ships and floating machinery there but too big to paddle round.  A floating crane, a big grain elevator and a passenger ship.  They also had a battery of old liner sirens hooked to the boilers on the passenger ship and they were wonderful.....


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 29/05/2007 : 13:04

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Metcalfe's MT Robert M. My stab at being a "Tanker Man" 1990. She sailed from Eastham on the Mersey to Stanlow oil refinery tranporting bitumen.

1970 / 1675gt - ex Cree-77

Built by Hong Kong & Whampoa Dock Co., Hong Kong (1065)
Operated by James Fisher & Sons (Coe Metcalfe).

Seen passing through Rendsburg on 8th June 1997

Sold later in 1997 and renamed NESA-R




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 29/05/2007 : 13:10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1972 / 12595gt - ex Kyma-97, Chiquita Tower-94, Silver Tower-91, South Fountain-85, Malayan King-84, Snow Land-81

Built by Chantiers Navals de la Ciotat, La Ciotat (281)
Operated by Holy House Shipping

Seen in Antwerp on 20th June 2002

She was the Silver Tower when I was her chief engineer.




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 29/05/2007 : 16:48

The life of a Junior Engineer in the 1970s.

I joined my first ship The MV City of Worcester at Salford Docks in Manchester on Friday the 15th May 1970. She had, had her top mast's and upper funnel removed at Eastham Locks, to facilitate her navigation under Runcorn and a few other bridges on the Manchester Ship Canal. I was shown to my cabin by the Chief Engineer. In those days you stood to attention for all senior M.N. officers. The Chief didnt take long in explaining that to me, in a manner that left no uncertainties as to what level you were on as a junior engineer. Within a couple of hours I had realized that a junior engineer was just a stepup from an oilrag. However this was the life I wanted and I was left with little alternative, you either accepted it or left.

The following morning I was given a tour of the engine room, Sulzer, RT 8 cylinder two stroke marine engine deveoping 4000shp @ 115 r.p.m.. Quite small in comparison to some of todays behemoths. By 9 o'clock my tour was finished and resplendent in new bright white boilersuit I was instructed to go on deck and lock in the drives for the ships derricks so that the crew could start unloading the cargo. By the time I had completed this exercise it was around 10 o'clock and in the finest of British Merchant Navy tradition it was announced that it was smokeo. I had never heard the expression before, but soon learned that all engineers retreated to the engineers mess room for tea and a cigerette at 10 in the morning when a ship was in port, except when on standby for manouvres.

To be continued.




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/05/2007 : 07:05
More Robert....more!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 04/06/2007 : 20:11

After Smoko, we returned to the engine room, and started to do one of the cylinder inserts. This basicly was the removal of the cylinder head, changeing the injector, cleaning out the cylinder  inlet and exhaust ports, replacing the scavenge feed valves, and replacing the gaskets and seals . There wasnt any pneumatic machinary in those days, so the removal of the cylinderhead nuts was done with a huge socket spanner and a sledgehammer. Although there were engine room ratings on board this work was completed by the engineers, and guess who got to do the donkeywork. Youv'e guessed it. It was the junior engineers. When I joined the City of Worcester, I relieved a junior and he went home on the Saturday. That left a junior engineer who had sailed the ship on her last deep sea trip and had stayed onboard to complete the coastal voyage. He was from Glasgow, his name was Tony Fabrizio. In those days Engineers only worked until lunchtime on a Saturday when in port. So by the time we had removed the cylinder head it was knock off time, and the duty engineer's, took over responsibility until Monday morning. I obviously had not the experience to be given a duty engineers rota. However this luxury was not to last for very long.



Edited by - Invernahaille on 04 June 2007 20:40:37


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