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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted -  16/01/2008  :  16:27
I've opened this thread to make a place for some pictures of motor vehicles - interesting or attractive or just simply curious. I've started it below with three pictures taken at a steam rally a few years ago. I've got a few more but please feel free to contribute pictures.

Tizer 


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Doreen
hippies understudy


429 Posts
Posted - 30/01/2008 : 17:49
  steamengwyeld


Dordygail

always the one to make the best of things.

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Doreen
hippies understudy


429 Posts
Posted - 30/01/2008 : 18:06
Follow the same order as photos

1908 Garrett Showmans Road Loco. British Hero.

Owned by Charlie Saunders and Bruce Whatley of Huntingdon.

This 6 nhp compound road engine, W. No. 27160, Reg. No. AD 1891, was delivered new to Alfred Dawson of Ipswich, Suffolk, but was returned to Garretts in 1909.
   In May 1910, it went to W. E. Swallow of Barton Guiting, Gloucestershire, and was named Cotswold Queen. There it did general haulage work.
   In September 1921  it was with T. Walker of Tewksbury, Gloucestershire, and was converted to a Showman's engine. Later that year  it went to a Showman in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, who re-named it British Hero. In 1935  it was with John Harness Rundle of Lincolnshire and was used for general work.
   In 1956 it was purchased for preservation by Mr. Orth of Maldon, Essex, and called Crimson Lady. During its 35 years there it was only occasionally steamed, mainly at Christmas, and was once rallied at Great Baddow in Essex.
   In October 1991 it was purchased by the present co-owners who almost completely rebuilt this engine and restored its name to British Hero. Pictured at the 2001 Lincolnshire Steam &Vintage Rally, it is the only surviving Garrett Showman's Engine.
1908 Ruston, Proctor Rusty/1913 Foden Road Loco Monarch.
Owned by The Wyeld Family.

Rusty, No. 34987, Reg. No. AH 5654, was bought for scrap in 1966 and restored by the late Roger Wyeld. It was first rallied in 1967 after spending all its working life in Norfolk and its last day of commercial threshing was at North Elmham on May 26th, 1949. It is now in its 40th year of rallying with the third generation of the family and has attended every Weeting rally.
   Monarch, No. 3534, was acquired in 1997 from the late Stan Burgess of Haddenham who had restored it after twenty years of dereliction. The Wyeld’s then did a lot of work on it in their workshops, culminating in dismantling the engine, so that the boiler could be taken to the premises of Mervyn Mayes at Yaxham. There it was fitted with a new riveted fire box before being returned to the Wyeld’s workshop for re-assembly in the engine. Meanwhile new stays had been manufactured and line boring of the main bearings of the crankshaft had been done.
1913 Foden 4-ton Wagon.
Owned by Duncan Marsden.

This wagon was new to J. Lawton of Manchester, whose original livery it still carries. It spent 51 years in the Henry Ford museum in America, returning to the UK in 1980. 
______________________________________________________________
 I was brought up with all these lovely old girls , and many more,  seen at the yearly rally
in Saffron Walden Essex

Edited by - Doreen on 30/01/2008 6:14:03 PM


Dordygail

always the one to make the best of things.

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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 30/01/2008 : 20:11
Hello Doreen. I wondered when you might visit us in this thread - I enjoy your other posts! Thanks for sharing your fabulous pictures. Have you ever seen any steam engines in Spain?

Tizer 


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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 30/01/2008 : 23:54
Yes nice pictures Doreen, I particularly like the Foden steam wagon. She still carries the original 1920's paintwork that she wore when Henry Ford wisked her off to the States, something that you just don't see. Most restored engines have paintwork recreated from black and white pictures.

Malcolm


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/01/2008 : 08:02
I asked John the other day how the refurb of the Scammell Crusader was going when he delivered my crate.  He said they are getting there, new cab and a top class paint job.  It will be worth seeing when it is finished.  Useful tool as well, 450hp Jimmy in it, it could pull a house down, literally!  Not sure if he's left the winch on it, I think so......


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/01/2008 : 08:05

Annie, John's straw burner.......


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 31/01/2008 : 20:18
Alvis car and Alvis engined aircraft

The car is an Alvis photographed at Duxford aerodrome at an Alvis owners' club meeting in the 1980s. As well as the cars, there were Alvis-powered army scout cars and an armoured car.  The aircraft was there because it has an Alvis engine - I think it's a Percival Provost.


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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 31/01/2008 : 23:16
I am sure Stanley won't mind me mentioning that the engine in his picture is a rare Davey Paxman machine built in Colchester, an export job that never left home. More details on adventures with this beast appear in Stanley's Memoires (available elsewhere on this site).
Nowadays it is the fashion to re-import machines, but in the days when when this one arrived on the rally scene, I am sure it caused quite a stir. Export machines were usually a lot bigger than the home market jobs.

Tizer

Looks very much like a Percival Provost to me, they were fitted with an Alvis Leonides air-cooled radial engine. Wonder if they ever tried that in a car!

Malcolm 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/02/2008 : 05:05
Don't mind at all.  In the last couple of years it's had a new firebox and tubes.  Probably the biggest boiler on a TE in the UK.  Very free steamer, 3" tubes, made that big for the straw burning, they tended to clog with bird's nests on the firebox end if any smaller.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 01/02/2008 : 12:33
Knowing nothing about boilers and straw burning, I'm surpised that you can run a steam traction engine on straw. I would have thought the firebox would have to be bigger than the boiler to take enough straw to keep the beast going. Is the straw specially compacted to take less space?

Of course, if the straw comes from a farmyard it might be full of cow dung which would make things go well. The locals in India keep their fires going with cow dung - I wonder if anyone has run a steam engine on cow dung alone?


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/02/2008 : 14:00
It is a big firebox and used to be fed by a conveyor arrangement carrying loose straw which fired just about instantaneously when it entered the box.  You can always tell a strawburner or a woodburner because they have a hole through the firebox wall on the level of the tube plate protected with a cover.  You could open the cover and shove an iron rod or stick in and rattle it across the tube plate to knock the bird's nests off.  By the way, these were of course bits of charred straw that had lodged on the tube opening.  Called bird's nests for obvious reasons.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/02/2008 : 09:10
I've been scanning pics in recently.  All part of the campaign to get every neg on disk......  (I should live that long)  It struck me that we always see these pics of old machinery polished up and on show to the public in all their glory.  There is another side to the story:

Here's an engine that was up for sale in 1994 and going cheap because it needed (according to the 'experts') a new firebox wrapper  (and perhaps a firebox as well) re-tubing and a few other minor jobs.  One sensible man had a word with John Ingoe at Rochdale Welding, bought the engine and gave it to us for TLC......

After a very thorough inspection and consultations with the insurance company we set to.  Firebox was OK so the first job was to re-tube it.  Then we looked at the wrapper.  The problem was grooving in the back corners of the wrapper, completely inaccessible of course.  John had a bit of a think, consulted Paul my mate who is an artist with a stick welder and the first thing we did was take the wheel and the gearing off at each side, cut a piece of the horn plate out, cut the grovved section out of the corner on each side and then bung the hole up again by welding it.

Here's the completed weld having a dye penetration test and ready for ultrasonic and magnetic flux NDT.  Perfect repair.  Weld the section of the horn plate back in, replace the wheels and gearing and then hydraulic test to ten year standard.  Just shows what can be done by men who have the skills......


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/02/2008 : 09:27
Here's another set of pics on the same theme.  There was an ex Ribble Cement 8 legger chassis sat on a farm near Clitheroe and a decision was made to bring it back from the dead.....

First thing to do was put a new battery on, attach the jump leads for insurance and then get the Gardner to cough.......  Once started it was driven onto the low loader under its own steam....

There was a bit of a p[roblem with a stiff clutch and brakes that needed freeing but here it is, perched on the trailer and ready for the next stage on the long journey back to an immaculate show exhibit.  This was 1994 and I haven't heard anything about it since.....



Stanley Challenger Graham




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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 05/02/2008 : 23:33
Blimey Stanley!

Hadn't realised that you burst into colour in the 1990's!

Amazing how many repairs are being carried out to traction engines etc that would never have been done 40 years ago. Many historical engines were broken up beacause their  (scrap) value was less than the cost of repairs. I remember seeing a portable engine on my first trip to Ireland in 1967, with the flywheel cut off with a gas torch. Dad said that nobody would bother to repair it. I wonder if they ever did.

Nowadays it seems that a lot of boiler problems are being repaired when the cost and trouble seem would seem to justify a new boiler. I wonder if this has anything to do with retaining "Grandfather's rights" on the specification, and avoiding the problem of getting a new boiler through the EC Pressure Vessel Regs.
 
Good to see the old wagon burst into life. No wonder the professionals (especially the showmen) loved a Gardner!

Malcolm


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 06/02/2008 : 05:27
Malcolm the reason why more trouble is taken is because the end value of the boilers is so high.  Take Annie, John put a new firebox in and re-tubed it and the value must have shot up by over £10,000 if ever he sold it.  Same with the convertible above, It was a cheap engine after the repairs and the refurb on the rest of it.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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