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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted -  21/12/2007  :  11:56
I have uploaded my first picture to the Barlick site I hope to be able to add it in this thread if/when it gets approval from Doc. It is a postcard from the 1940s entitled Winged Heroes and showing Hawker Hurricanes. (The picture is in the next post if you are on page 1 of the thread; if you are on another page you need to go back tp page 1 to see it.)

Please feel free to add your own stories, pictures or comments regarding everything to do with aeroplanes and their pilots, both past and present.

Edited by - Tizer on 11/11/2010 15:11:42


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Ribble Rouser
Regular Member


125 Posts
Posted - 14/01/2008 : 02:32
Magnificent!


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 14/01/2008 : 12:01
Seeing the big flying boats makes me think of the Brabazon. A friend told me recently how his mother took him, as a small child, about 50 yards down the road from their house (Higher Croft, Blackburn) to watch the Brabazon fly over. He still wonders why they had to walk 50 yards rather than stand in their back garden! (Perhaps his mother thought it was going to come over at rooftop height and wanted a wider view.)

Tizer 


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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 14/01/2008 : 22:56
Tizer

There are some newsreel film excerpts of the Brabazon and the Princess Flying Boats on U Tube, I got to them via Google. Amazing Giants of the Air!

I knew I had a DC3 picture somewhere.

Air Atlantique Douglas DC3

This dates from many years ago. When our regular overnight freight carriers had too much freight for their aircraft, Air Atlantique from Coventry could always conjure up a DC3 and crew to do the job. Trouble was, they would usually deliver the load and trundle back off to Coventry before it was light enough for a picture. I believe this aircraft,  G-AMSA is still in their fleet.

Loganair Fokker F 27 

The Fokker F 27, powered by the Rolls Royce Dart turbo prop engine, was the most successful of the Dakota replacements. They were even licence built in the States as the Friendship. However the new turbo prop technology wasn't as easy to repair and maintain, so a lot of DC3 s soldiered on.

Handley Page Herald

The Handley Page Herald, also powered by the RR Dart, was the British Dakota replacement. It came into service a year or so after the F 27 and never really caught on. I believe less than 50 were made. This is a visitng British Air Ferries aircraft. Our local freight operator, Air Bridge, ran one on the overnight freight run to France for years. Until one day, at Lille, they tried to tow it down the hangar with the brakes still on, and pulled the nosewheel off!

Malcolm 


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 14/01/2008 : 23:18
Malcolm, I have sent my son Dan a PM re the DC3 to see if they still have it, he works for the company at Coventry.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 15/01/2008 : 12:34
Malcolm, great pictures! I remember that in about (I think) 1990 my neighbour at that time went on a "pleasure flight" along the south coast of England in a Dakota. A company offered people flights but I don't know if it still exists.

We are lucky here in our bit of south-west England that we are on a flight path for RAF aircraft and also not far from RNAS Yeovilton. As well as the military jobs we also get our own personal fly-past of Red Arrows about once a year and some of the old planes too. It's quite something on a summer's afternoon, sitting in the garden with a cup of tea, to hear that sudden roar of engines and the Red Arrows come over at what feels like rooftop height! I recall a Dakota a couple of times, and once we were shocked to see a Catalina!

The Hercules fly over regularly and we will very much miss them when they are gone. When they come over three at a time it makes me think of what it must have been like on the bomber aerodromes in the war. There are lots of Harriers and helicopters from Yeovilton but best of all is an old plane that gets "taken for a run" now and then - I think it must be a Hawker Sea Fury. The pilot likes to do some loops to impress us all.

When we go on holiday to Cornwall we often go to the viewing point at RNAS Culdrose. Last year they told us to hang around for a while because they had just heard that the Red Arrows were going to drop in to re-fuel. It's worth watching because they never do anything by halves and they like to show off (and quite right too). They came over in formation, did a few turns, landed one by one, then taxied back from the far end of the runway in formation - a wonderful sight and very impressive with all those red aircraft coming straight at you through the heat haze from the engines. They taxied right up in front of the buildings, just liking parking a car. They must be worth their weight in gold for the boost it gives to the morale of service men and women - even if they are RAF visiting an RN base!



Edited by - Tizer on 15/01/2008 12:37:44


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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 15/01/2008 : 17:18
Ian

Be interested to know if G-AMSA is still about. I also have an early morning shot of another one, G-AMRA. I seem to remember that AA had DC3s on permanent standby for marine pollution incidents.

Tizer

Glad you menjoyed the pictures, makes me realise how things have changed in my working life. At one time, the Rolls Royce Dart was the dominent noise at work, with Viscounts and F 27s on passenger and freight, and the Heralds and Argosies (the Whistling Wheelbarrow) on overnight freight. Nowadays, virtually the only big turboprop we hear is the Hercules that you mention.
The RAF ones come over regularly to learn the approach in case of emergency diversion. There are still two freight Hercules trundling around at times, but I think they are here for maintainence not actually running cargo.

I don't like to swamp the site with photos, but I will post another 3 that I have found which may be of interest.

Malcolm


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 15/01/2008 : 18:59
I don't think there would be any objection to more pictures Malcolm, In fact I'm sure of it. They are all good ones. Dan only joined the site at Christmas and is not on very often so we may have to be a bit patient. I'll ask him direct next time we speak on the phone.


Ian Go to Top of Page
softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 15/01/2008 : 22:45
Thanks Ian

Here is another one to ask your lad about:

Douglas DC 6

I seemed to remember that Air Atlantique had some DC 6s when they first started,but got rid of them. In the 1980s they got another pair. These used to come in occasionally as well, this is G-SIXC. They always struck me as too graceful for a freight plane. According to my books they were a development of the first four engined Douglas, the DC4.

Bristol B 170 Freighter

This is a personal favourite that I've spoken about before. Run by AA on behalf of the owners, Instone Air, she was also a regular in the 1980's. She was very useful if the carriers had an extra load of car panels or screens from Ford at Cologne. She is alleged to be ex RNZAF, and used by them in Vietnam, hence the perspex panels that you can just see at the bottom of the clam doors. The clam doors by the way were" Armstrongs Patent", a chain and hand crank, no hydraulics! She went on loan to Duxford, then Alaska for the oil industry, and finally got written-off at an Airshow many years ago, luckily the crew got away.
These B 170's. in extended form, were used for the famous Silver City Cross-Channel car ferry from Lydd to Le Touquet in the 1950's.

CL 44 Conroy Conversion

Finally one with a (sort of) Barlick connection. When I photographed this beast I never realised what a unique plane it was. Apparently, it was designed by the same team who built the famous "Guppy" (but under a different company name) specially to carry three RB 2-11 jet engines at a time, from the UK to the Lockheed plant in California, when they were building the Tristar.
As we have learned earlier, the RB stands for Rolls-Barlick!
When I saw this beast, she was carrying racehorses to France for a well known specialist, HeavyLift Airlines. Apparently, she is still active in Australia, not bad for a one off. By the way, the CL 44, on which she is based, is the Canadian version of of the Bistol Brittania, but with RR Tyne engines instead of Bristol's own.

That's enough for now!

Malcolm


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Ribble Rouser
Regular Member


125 Posts
Posted - 16/01/2008 : 06:43
Nice to see the old Bristol Freighter in this thread. Always a favourite. I built an Airfix one as a kid…didn’t you just love those opening clamshell doors in the kit? Several regularly lumbered across my sky till I moved away from Melbourne in the early 80s. I seem to remember one crashed into Bass Strait out of Essendon (Melbourne) in the 1970s, but I can’t find a reference to it, so perhaps my memory is muddled. Aren’t DC 6s based on DC 4s with uprated engines and designed from the outset for the commercial market…the DC 7 a new design offering pressurisation? The modified CL44 in Australia? Haven’t heard of it, but then I just this moment found out that Heavylift Cargo Airlines have been operating Short Belfasts out of Brisbane. Will keep an eye out for news.

DCs 3-7 used to swarm into Essendon Airport in the second half of the 1960s. I used to catch two trams and climb the high retaining wall of a deep road cutting near the end of the north-south runway and press myself against the perimeter fence not far from the piano keys, which put me under the approach path just before they flared out for touchdown. Mighty! But don’t undershoot, boys. Could be messy. Apart from the DCs, there were: Viscounts; Electras; Friendships; Freighters; the modified cargo DC6s with a bulbous nose; Argosys; HS 748s; Doves; a Catalina; an Anson; a Dragon (called Puff the Magic - used to do bay and traffic reports for the radio); and just once that I saw, a Constellation. What a treat. I seem to recall reading that the last Ju 52 operating in the New Guinea highlands was still there and hoping against hope that it would fly into my neighbourhood. It never did. The Short Sandringhams were still flying a service to Lord Howe Island from Rose Bay in Sydney. Later, I remember saving up for ages so that I could go on the flight, as a reward for finishing my secondary schooling. Alas, the service was closed down not long before my finals. Sorry…no pics. This was before the days of regular international flights into Melbourne, and before I had a camera.





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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 17/01/2008 : 14:15
De Havilland Mosquito areoplane

De Havilland Mosquito flying at Duxford, UK, in 1989. The photo quality is not very good but it shows the characteristic shape of this beautiful aeroplane. I wonder if it is still flying?


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 20/01/2008 : 16:56
RAF twin-engine aircraft photograhed in 1936

(Edit on 21 Jan 2008: this aeroplane has since been identified on OGFB as the Vickers Wellington prototype B.9/32 with RAF serial number K4049 which first flew on 15 June 1936 and, after changes to the design, was accepted for production on 15 August 1936. See posts below for more information and links.)

This unidentified RAF twin-engine aeroplane is from a photo dated 1936. It has just taken off from an aerodrome but little else can be seen in the original picture other than distant trees and a biplane in the distance. The back of the photo has been "rubber stamped" Royal Air Force Office" and has only the handwritten notes "26 AC SQDN 6-10-36" and "NEG. No. H332G" (see also the photo of the Gloster Gauntlet earlier in this thread which bears the same date and squadron and "NEG. No. H330G".

I have no idea what type of aircraft this is. It existed in 1936, has twin-engines and appears to have a fabric-covered fuselage. It looks surprisingly streamlined for 1936. The tail end of the fuselage looks unusually fat - like it has been altered for some reason. Ideas anyone?

Edited by - Tizer on 21/01/2008 11:39:51


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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 20/01/2008 : 19:03
Reminds me a bit of a Wellington, could this be the Wellington prototype?


Malcolm


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 20/01/2008 : 19:26
The Wellington prototype Type 271 used a geodesic fuselage construction with doped fabric covering, looks very similar Malcolm. The first prototype first flew on 15th June 1936. Vickers gun turrets were added from Type 290 on the Wellington MK I production models.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Wellington


Ian Go to Top of Page
Ribble Rouser
Regular Member


125 Posts
Posted - 20/01/2008 : 19:32
Confirmed. Try: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qlx_FoDR8Qg&feature


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 20/01/2008 : 20:02
Nice clip John, looks like Tizers still is taken from the original film of the prototype flight.


Ian Go to Top of Page
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