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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted -  26/06/2006  :  04:02







Edited by - Invernahaille on 10 April 2007 04:41:19
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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 22/02/2009 : 11:18
I recall that Stokers and Chefs got on well, maybe something to do with requirement of ingredients for food during the night watches, ie, Pot mess.

I never thought of that until I just read your post, but it's true stokers and chefs did get on well together. May be it was because they spent a lot of time together outside the jossmans office, and at Captains Table !!!!!!!



Frank Wilkinson       Once Navy Always Navy Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 22/02/2009 : 17:27
Bottom line is that we all depended on each other. The Stargazers pointed us in the right direction, and the Gingerbeers got us there.
Chippies, (carpenters) made sure we had water,  the Pursers made sure we got fed,  sparks (Radio Officer) kept us in communication with the rest of the world.
Incidently the Radio Officers at the time where not company men. They were employed by Marconi. They were contracted in on an as needed basis.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 24/02/2009 : 20:13
Just been looking at pics of "Intrepid" being torn apart in Canada dock Liverpool. She was my last ship and the Commanding Officer then was Cdr. J G Richards.OBE. What is remarkable about this is that Cdr Richards was an Engineer Officer and the OBE was awarded for his work on designing the "Docking" ballast arrangments common to both Intrepid and Fearless. Sadly, I heard recently that "Gray" died last year, roughly about the time that his ship left Pompey for the Mersey.


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 26/02/2009 : 13:10
Thomo.
Strange how we get attached to ships. The public dont understand that, that huge piece of steel has been your home for a few months. I have taken a couple of ships to the scrapyards at Cochin and Alang.

I thought that R.N. Engineer Officer's could ony rise to Lt. That to rise to Lt Com, Com, and then Captain, they had to transfer to the seaman branch. I could be totally incorrect in that statement I was a Merchantman. I do recall on a few occasions lowering the ensign when we passed Grey Funnel Line ships at sea.


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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 26/02/2009 : 13:25
Commander E was a rank in the RN but only on big ships. Fearless and Intrepid both had commander Es. With the Deputy Marine Engineering Officer being a Lt Commander.

I do recall on a few occasions lowering the ensign when we passed Grey Funnel Line ships at sea.
 That was a mark of respect,  because you never knew when you would need a Tow or to be Rescued lolol



Frank Wilkinson       Once Navy Always Navy Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 26/02/2009 : 16:56
There certainly are several Captains "E" and indeed a few Admirals, the Maren Branch in the "Mob" is no bar to advancement. My old friend Cdr Richards was a very senior Commander, only a health problem halted his further promotion.


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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 26/02/2009 : 20:05
Was a Captain E  not the senior Engineer for a Squadron ?? I think we had a Captain E in the Dartmouth Trainig Squadron.



Frank Wilkinson       Once Navy Always Navy Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/02/2009 : 09:20
When I was at Sultan for part two, Catain E, Harcus was the CO, He is now an Admiral. Probably another one at HMS Thunderer, Manadon.


thomo Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2009 : 13:37
Well there you go. You learn something new wevery dat. Thanks for the Info.


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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2009 : 14:24
Probably another one at HMS Thunderer, Manadon.

 A  Cathedral of Engineering, Manadon



Frank Wilkinson       Once Navy Always Navy Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 03/03/2009 : 09:36
Aye, and the other "Thunderer" (Orion class Battleship) was my Fathers home for six years during WW1 along with at least two other Barlickers. I understand that she finished her time,as a training ship for engineers. Still have a much faded cap tally.


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AlanMc
Regular Member


770 Posts
Posted - 04/03/2009 : 08:43
  Hello Ship-mates.

  I wonder if any of you nautical engineers could assist me.
  I am researching and writing a book about boiler explosions: HISTORIC STEAM BOILER EXPLOSIONS.  The book mainly chronicles explosions in Victorian and Edwardian textile mills, ironworks,collieries etc; with chapters covering railway locomotive and traction engine explosions.  Can anyone point me in the direction of any BRITISH boiler explosions: Royal Navy or Merchant??
 Regards.
Alan McEWEN.



Emotionswww.sledgehammerengineeringpress.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 04/03/2009 : 08:59
From the chapter on boilers in 'Brown and Pickles'. (obtainable at Lulu.com)

'On November 16th 1815 the 2000 gallon boiler supplying high pressure steam to a 6hp engine at the sugar refinery of the Constadt Company of Well Close Square, Wapping exploded causing six deaths and the destruction of property estimated in value as £25,000. On May 18th 1817 the boiler of the Yarmouth Steam Packet exploded on the River Yare at Norwich and killed eight people. This latter event led to the establishing of a Select Committee of the House of Commons to investigate the best means of preventing such explosions on steam boats. In the course of their discussions the Wapping explosion was brought to the Committee’s attention and it took explosions ‘in manufactories and other works’ into consideration. The Committee reported on 24th June 1817 and made recommendations which, although they did not lead to legislation and were primarily concerned with marine boilers, were the first rules for the regulation of the use of steam boilers ever brought before Parliament. Some idea of the size of the problem that was accumulating can be gained from the fact that in 1870/1871 there were estimated to be 100,000 boilers in operation in the United Kingdom excluding domestic, locomotive and marine installations.'


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 07/03/2009 : 09:39


I found this slide this morning while I was tidying up. It's an old steam ferry boat at San Francisco moored up near Sausalito and used as a hoseboat. It was occupied when I did the pic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/03/2009 : 07:43
Still scanning negs and here are some pics from a visit to London Docks in 1976.



The Nore lightship. Retired and moored in St Katherine's Dock.



The Lady Daphne. This reckoned to be a Thames Barge but it looks a bit too gentrified to me.



The tug Challenge retired but still looks ready for work. Tough little boats.



Another pic of the Challenge with the Seaman's Mission behind. I wonder whether it's still there?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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